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Copyright and web lectures

A web lecture is a recording of a presentation, a lecture, a class, a keynote, or even a workshop that can be viewed after the event has taken place.

The basic principle behind web lectures is that they should serve as a reference and are only intended for students in the relevant course. You can read more about this on the staff website.

Frequently asked questions

The Code of Conduct for remote teaching teaching provides information on the storage term of web lectures when personal data are involved. In such cases the storage term is 2-3 years, as explainend in article 6c of the Code.

As a general rule, copyright lasts for the life of the author plus an additional 70 years. More information is provided by the Dutch language website auteursrecht.nl.

We recommend you use open access materials as much as possible; you can read more about this on our page on copyright for teachers.

Yes. An online lecture, for instance in Kalture Live Room, is a virtual classroom. Article 12.5 Dutch Copyright Act (DCA) offers a provision to display copyright protected materials in a classroom. This may apply to a presentation (whether in PowerPoint, or in Prezi, or another presentation tool), the screening of a movie or the hearing of a piece of music. The display has to be part of the teaching plan and applies only to lectures and classes that are offered to students enrolled in the particular course.

No. When you record a lecture and you make the recording available to students, the Dutch Copyright Act (DCA) considers this to be a new instance of ‘making public’ the materials. The exception provided in article 12.5 DCA (see above) no longer applies. As a result, you may not screen a whole movie, or listen to a concert in a weblecture.  However, you may be able to make use of the exceptions for citations/quotations (hereafter: ‘Citation Exception’) and for education (hereafter: ‘Education Exception’), please see below.

The Citation Exception (article 15a Dutch Copyright Act) implies that a (small) part of the copyrighted work of someone else (the creator) may be used in one’s own work. Permission of the creator is not required, nor does the creator need to be compensated for this use. The Citation Exception applies to the display of copyrighted materials in a web lecture. The citation must be functional and may not be used solely for the purpose of decoration; additionally, the citation must be proportional and should always be subordinate tot he discourse in your lecture. In so far as reasonably possible, the source, including the creator’s name, must be clearly indicated.

How to apply this in practice:

  • Use of images, graphs, diagrams photographs, etc. in your presentation (this also applies to slides that you would upload as a document to BrightSpace for your students):
    • Always indicate the correct source for each image (title book or journal, issue) and the name of the author (creator).
    • Do not use more than 2, 3 at maximum, images from the same source, meaning from the same book or journal issue.
    • Additionally, do not use more than 2, 3 at maximum, images from the same photographer, or pieces of art from the same artist.
    • When using images from the Internet the source, including the creator’s name and URL, has to be clearly indicated (as far as reasonably possible). 
  • If you wish to show a video from YouTube, you can screen it in the live classroom (Kaltura), but in the recorded lecture, you will have to replace it with a link. The same applies to audio materials. If it is not possible to link to the video or audio materials, you may use no more than a small fragment in your web lecture.

If you wish to re-use more than 3 images in your slides, please look at the Education Exception below

The Education Exception (article 16 Dutch Copyright Act) implies that a part of the copyrighted work of someone else (the creator) may be used in teaching. The Education Exception applies to copyrighted materials that are used in web lectures, but are not covered by the Citation Exception (see above).

For the use of these materials a fee has to be paid to the creator or other copyright holder. How to apply this to web lectures?

  • The use of images, graphs, diagrams, photographs, etc. in your  presentation (this also applies to slides that you would upload to BrightSpace for your students):
    • 3 items or less from the same source: the Citation Exception applies.
    • More than 3 items from the same source: the Easy Access Agreement with stichting UvO applies.
  • Always indicate the correct source for each image (title book or journal, issue) and the name of the author (creator). When using images from the Internet the source, including the creator’s name and URL, has to be clearly indicated (as far as reasonably possible).
  • Video materials that have not been created by the lecturer, and that are copyrighted by an external creator: the Easy Access Agreement does not apply; the lecturer may only use the video materials as described in the section regarding the Citation Exception above.
  • Audio materials that have not been created by the lecturer, and that are copyrighted by an external creator: the Easy Access Agreement does not apply; the lecturer may only use the video materials as described in the section regarding the Citation Exception above.

Sometimes you may wish to distribute the web lecture to an audience wider than just the students enrolled in the particular course, for instance to ULCN/LUMC account holders, or the general public. If you do so, the Education Exception no longer applies; however, the Citation Exception does continue to apply.

If you wish to share audio- or video material created by others, in your web lectures, we strongly recommend that you use materials that are open access or otherwise in the public domain and/or link to material in the collections of the UBL. Always make a proper reference to the name of the creator and the source of the material, unless this is not possible. If the material does not have an open license or cannot be linked to, follow the instructions covered by the sections on the Citation Exception and the Education Exception.

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